Team Pronto builds skills in robotics, leadership, and more

There’s a place for everyone on Team Pronto

The+pit+crew+on+deck%2C+about+to+compete.+From+left+to+right%3A+Steven+Alex+McLeod%2C+Anna+Brooks%2C+Colin+Cook%2C+Xavier+Beech%2C+Ryan+Stege.

by Veronica Cook

The pit crew on deck, about to compete. From left to right: Steven Alex McLeod, Anna Brooks, Colin Cook, Xavier Beech, Ryan Stege.

by Ein McCue, staff

Don your safety orange and neon green and make way for Shoreline’s Robotics and Engineering Club. The Robotics Club hosts two teams, Team Scotbots and Team Pronto. 

Scotbots allows people from around the district to join their team, regardless of whether or not you go to Shorewood, though most of the members attend Shorewood High School.

Each section has a captain. The Scotbots captains are: Build captain Robbie Elerick, CAD captain Robert Olomon, Electronics captain Hali Taddei, and Programming captain Manoli Tramountanas. The members of Team Pronto include Build captain Colin Cook, CAD captain Racer Wagoner, Electronics captain Steven Alex McLeod, and Programming captain Ryan Stege. 

Colin Cook, junior, details his responsibilities as Build Captain. “Personally, I worked to keep the shop organized as well as building a few mechanisms on the robot. Mechanisms including a lift that allows our robot to pull itself off the group as well as a few projects involving pneumatics,” he said.

Hali Taddei, junior, explains that this season she “led the electronics activity and initiated them, but a group of four or five students work on them together.” 

This activity she initiated was “designing the electronics board, building the actual board itself, wiring the off-board motors, limiting switches, encoders and other things back to the board and more,” she detailed.

Both teams have one safety captain. Scotbots’ electronics captain and safety captain is Hali Taddei, and Pronto’s safety captain is Esteban Guerrero. Taddei explains the duties of the safety captain. This includes, “advising team members on safety procedures, instructing them at both competition and in the auto-shop on how to be more safe, reporting and taking care of any injuries, and preventing as many injuries as possible.”

As safety captain, Taddei ensures that no one gets injured by, “doing the safety procedure presentation and the tests. Then during the actual season, I reminded people of shop safety and did injury reports for when people got cuts and whatnot.”

It is a club that teaches students skills both in actual robotics, in teamwork, leadership, and many more things. There is a place for anyone on the team. It is a wonderful community with lots of amazing people.”

— Hali Taddei

At the moment, both teams work in one auto shop. Building two separate robots in build season for competing. Pronto is not allowed to help Scotbots with their robot in any way, and vice versa. They simply walk around each other to get what they need and continue on. 

Build season is when “the team is given a task to complete and we then work for approximately six weeks to design, build and program a robot from scratch to complete the task,” explains Cook. 

Before build season, the two teams come together to teach new members about the four sections you can join within a team. Build, CAD, electronics, and programming.

Going to the club, members can learn how to assemble a robot and enjoy it as it runs around in competition. Cook encourages joining the Robotics and Engineering club saying that “Robotics is a really fun way to get involved in STEM while learning skills that directly translate to almost any job on the market.” 

Taddei says, “It is a club that teaches students skills both in actual robotics, in teamwork, leadership, and many more things. There is a place for anyone on the team. It is a wonderful community with lots of amazing people.”